How have Women Made a Life in Photography, and Earn a Lot of Money

Author : johnbright445
Publish Date : 2021-03-24 21:51:31


How have Women Made a Life in Photography, and Earn a Lot of Money

Since the beginning of photography, women have played an important role in it. Despite the fact that women are not credited with inventing photography, they have played an important role in working alongside pioneers, often printing for their husbands and taking photos themselves. In letters to his sister-in-law, Joseph Niépce, the inventor of photography, described his experiments. The first female photographers were Constance Talbot (1811-1880), the wife of photography pioneer Henry Fox Talbot, and Anna Atkins (1799-1871), an English botanist and associate of the Talbots. They were photographing alongside Talbot and his colleagues as they created and improved the first photographic methods. The photographic arts were a favourite of Queen Victoria. Queen Victoria began the tradition of placing visiting cards in albums, in addition to giving patronage to what would become The Royal Photographic Society. Photograph albums became a status symbol as the practise spread among aristocratic women, increasing the desire for and appreciation of photographic culture.

 By the 1880s, Kodak had recognised the growing popularity of photography among women and had launched a marketing campaign featuring the Kodak Girl. Women photographers and journalists started consciously promoting photography as a viable career option for women at the same time. The Ladies' Home Journal published an article titled "What a Woman Can Do with a Camera" in 1897. According to census data from the United Kingdom and the United States, there were over 7000 trained female photographers in the United Kingdom and the United States by 1900. At a time when it was uncommon for women to have a career, women made up almost 20% of the profession. In reality, photography studios boosted their profits by hiring "lady operators" to photograph women and families. Studio owners could draw more women and families for sittings if the photos were taken by a woman because there was the likelihood of physical interaction while posing subjects. Rather than attempting to fit themselves into a restrictive career, women are shaping photography to meet their needs.

 Gentlewomen practising photography as a creative tool contributed to the evolution of photography as art rather than science. Women like Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-1879) and Frances Benjamin Johnston (1864-1952) could innovate and drive photography into new realms, both in terms of the style of images taken and the nature of photographed subjects, since they were not limited by the need to make a living. Women combined their drawing and cutting skills with photography to make photo collages in the middle 1800s, proving that the concept of image compositing was alive and well. It was only a matter of time before photography became the main means of documenting conflict and current affairs. As the science of photography progressed, equipment became lighter and processing became simpler, allowing photographers to be more mobile. Photographers may be in the middle of domestic and frontline activities. However, women were also excluded from wars, the economy, and politics. Some women defied convention and became pioneer photojournalists. For example, while photographing the Spanish Civil War, Gerda Taro (1910-1937) collaborated with Robert Capa. Taro was noted for her personal approach to war photography, which focused on capturing the emotional meaning of events. Her photos showed the psychological and physical strains that soldiers faced. In 1937, when photographing the front lines on the front lines in Spain, she was killed in action. Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) is noted for her portraits of migrant workers taken during the Great Depression. Over the course of her career, Lange revealed a variety of social issues, but it was her emotionally charged photos from the 1930s that began to shift public perceptions of poverty in the United States. 

Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971) was the first woman photojournalist whose work was widely recognised for its depictions of conflict. Most of Gerda Taro's work was overshadowed by public admiration for the partnership's male partner. Bourke-White, on the other hand, worked alone and relied on small but significant advancements in women's rights to move her forward. During World War II, Bourke-White was permitted to photograph and fly with American troops. She went on to photograph the Korean War and India's civil rights struggles under Ghandi as part of her conflict coverage. While men still dominate the field of photojournalism, the trend is changing. Our exposure to conflict stories is broadening as more women become conflict photographers. Lynsey Addario (1973- ) and her female colleagues–Kate Brooks, Stacy Pearsall, Alixandra Fazzina, Amira Al-Sharif, and Rebecca Collard, to name a few–cover controversy all over the world, keeping up with their male counterparts and sometimes gaining access to stories that men aren't allowed to see. Women photojournalists have exposed the domestic hardships that war inflicts on Middle Eastern residents, exposed the abduction and rape of women in Darfur and Congo, profiled the plight of HIV-positive women in Somalia, disclosed the tragedy of child Afghan refugees fleeing the country for freedom, exposed the brutality of domestic violence in North America, and so much more.

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