INTERESTING FACTOIDS I BET YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT ANDROID

Author : takabims
Publish Date : 2021-04-09 13:24:32


INTERESTING FACTOIDS I BET YOU NEVER KNEW ABOUT ANDROID

The Latest Advertising Techniques have to Allow  Interactivity

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The world is awash in new advertising techniques these days. Microsoft's Xbox has its NUads that allows advertisers to use the Kinect motion detector to allow gaming audiences to watch and participate in interactive advertising. And then there is what the under-20s (or in other words, young people whose entire world is smart phones, apps, social networking and video games) now call augmented reality advertising.

You have to admit that the new advertising techniques certainly come with inspirational new names. Augmented reality, going by how they define it, is a way to engage in marketing product by allowing marketers and customers to interact with a product and with advertising through both reality and through digital representations. You get to interact with the product at the store, speak to the store personnel and seamlessly move on to the Internet or something else to look up and experience product details. Usually, you would get to do this on a display at the store or on your smart phone. So how exactly does anyone use augmented reality in real advertising campaigns?

Do you get the sneaking suspicion that as new advertising techniques go, augmented reality is more marketing jargon than something that's really new? The suspicion wouldn't be entirely off-base. Do you like to have Google Street View on your iPad as you drive down a road that's completely new to you? You switch between looking at the road before you and a video of it on Google Maps, with a line running down the middle; and you mentally put the two together. That would be augmented reality. Watching football on TV, you have always seen that yellow first down line painted on the field, right? That's not really painted on the field. It's digitally inserted in the TV image.

A couple of towns in Florida that recently wanted to attract young tourists from the North to their warm beaches in the middle of winter went about a campaign where people could take pictures of themselves on their smartphones and have themselves digitally inserted into pictures of Florida's beaches. It was a big hit and inspired lots of winter travel.

Most traditional advertising techniques are inefficient. A magazine ad can cost tens of thousands of dollars. And you wouldn't even know how many people you reached. Or if they were even relevant. In an augmented reality campaign on the other hand, you could be extremely targeted in your advertising, with the help of location sharing and GPS. There are so many creative possibilities in augmented reality that any small businesses with $5000 could use to create an emotional connection with thousands of potential customers.

 

The Latest Advertising Techniques have to Allow  Interactivity

The world is awash in new advertising techniques these days. Microsoft's Xbox has its NUads that allows advertisers to use the Kinect motion detector to allow gaming audiences to watch and participate in interactive advertising. And then there is what the under-20s (or in other words, young people whose entire world is smart phones, apps, social networking and video games) now call augmented reality advertising.

You have to admit that the new advertising techniques certainly come with inspirational new names. Augmented reality, going by how they define it, is a way to engage in marketing product by allowing marketers and customers to interact with a product and with advertising through both reality and through digital representations. You get to interact with the product at the store, speak to the store personnel and seamlessly move on to the Internet or something else to look up and experience product details. Usually, you would get to do this on a display at the store or on your smart phone. So how exactly does anyone use augmented reality in real advertising campaigns?

Do you get the sneaking suspicion that as new advertising techniques go, augmented reality is more marketing jargon than something that's really new? The suspicion wouldn't be entirely off-base. Do you like to have Google Street View on your iPad as you drive down a road that's completely new to you? You switch between looking at the road before you and a video of it on Google Maps, with a line running down the middle; and you mentally put the two together. That would be augmented reality. Watching football on TV, you have always seen that yellow first down line painted on the field, right? That's not really painted on the field. It's digitally inserted in the TV image.

A couple of towns in Florida that recently wanted to attract young tourists from the North to their warm beaches in the middle of winter went about a campaign where people could take pictures of themselves on their smartphones and have themselves digitally inserted into pictures of Florida's beaches. It was a big hit and inspired lots of winter travel.

Most traditional advertising techniques are inefficient. A magazine ad can cost tens of thousands of dollars. And you wouldn't even know how many people you reached. Or if they were even relevant. In an augmented reality campaign on the other hand, you could be extremely targeted in your advertising, with the help of location sharing and GPS. There are so many creative possibilities in augmented reality that any small businesses with $5000 could use to create an emotional connection with thousands of potential customers.

 

The Latest Advertising Techniques have to Allow  Interactivity

The world is awash in new advertising techniques these days. Microsoft's Xbox has its NUads that allows advertisers to use the Kinect motion detector to allow gaming audiences to watch and participate in interactive advertising. And then there is what the under-20s (or in other words, young people whose entire world is smart phones, apps, social networking and video games) now call augmented reality advertising.

You have to admit that the new advertising techniques certainly come with inspirational new names. Augmented reality, going by how they define it, is a way to engage in marketing product by allowing marketers and customers to interact with a product and with advertising through both reality and through digital representations. You get to interact with the product at the store, speak to the store personnel and seamlessly move on to the Internet or something else to look up and experience product details. Usually, you would get to do this on a display at the store or on your smart phone. So how exactly does anyone use augmented reality in real advertising campaigns?

Do you get the sneaking suspicion that as new advertising techniques go, augmented reality is more marketing jargon than something that's really new? The suspicion wouldn't be entirely off-base. Do you like to have Google Street View on your iPad as you drive down a road that's completely new to you? You switch between looking at the road before you and a video of it on Google Maps, with a line running down the middle; and you mentally put the two together. That would be augmented reality. Watching football on TV, you have always seen that yellow first down line painted on the field, right? That's not really painted on the field. It's digitally inserted in the TV image.

A couple of towns in Florida that recently wanted to attract young tourists from the North to their warm beaches in the middle of winter went about a campaign where people could take pictures of themselves on their smartphones and have themselves digitally inserted into pictures of Florida's beaches. It was a big hit and inspired lots of winter travel.

Most traditional advertising techniques are inefficient. A magazine ad can cost tens of thousands of dollars. And you wouldn't even know how many people you reached. Or if they were even relevant. In an augmented reality campaign on the other hand, you could be extremely targeted in your advertising, with the help of location sharing and GPS. There are so many creative possibilities in augmented reality that any small businesses with $5000 could use to create an emotional connection with thousands of potential customers.

The Latest Advertising Techniques have to Allow  Interactivity

The world is awash in new advertising techniques these days. Microsoft's Xbox has its NUads that allows advertisers to use the Kinect motion detector to allow gaming audiences to watch and participate in interactive advertising. And then there is what the under-20s (or in other words, young people whose entire world is smart phones, apps, social networking and video games) now call augmented reality advertising.

You have to admit that the new advertising techniques certainly come with inspirational new names. Augmented reality, going by how they define it, is a way to engage in marketing product by allowing marketers and customers to interact with a product and with advertising through both reality and through digital representations. You get to interact with the product at the store, speak to the store personnel and seamlessly move on to the Internet or something else to look up and experience product details. Usually, you would get to do this on a display at the store or on your smart phone. So how exactly does anyone use augmented reality in real advertising campaigns?

Do you get the sneaking suspicion that as new advertising techniques go, augmented reality is more marketing jargon than something that's really new? The suspicion wouldn't be entirely off-base. Do you like to have Google Street View on your iPad as you drive down a road that's completely new to you? You switch between looking at the road before you and a video of it on Google Maps, with a line running down the middle; and you mentally put the two together. That would be augmented reality. Watching football on TV, you have always seen that yellow first down line painted on the field, right? That's not really painted on the field. It's digitally inserted in the TV image.

A couple of towns in Florida that recently wanted to attract young tourists from the North to their warm beaches in the middle of winter went about a campaign where people could take pictures of themselves on their smartphones and have themselves digitally inserted into pictures of Florida's beaches. It was a big hit and inspired lots of winter travel.

Most traditional advertising techniques are inefficient. A magazine ad can cost tens of thousands of dollars. And you wouldn't even know how many people you reached. Or if they were even relevant. In an augmented reality campaign on the other hand, you could be extremely targeted in your advertising, with the help of location sharing and GPS. There are so many creative possibilities in augmented reality that any small businesses with $5000 could use to create an emotional connection with thousands of potential customers.

 



Category : travel

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